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Le Heron
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Le Heron
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POINTE DU RAZ - Brittany's wild west The western tip of Brittany is a wild and mythical place. Each of the rocks overlooked by the high, windswept cliffs, has a name. In good weather the Ile de Sein can be seen from the statue of Notre-Dame-des-Trepasses, which overlooks the sea. The Pointe du Van and Bay des Trepasses - the Van headland and the bay are not as popular with tourists but are no less attractive. The Bay des Trepasses (trespass bay) has a fine, curving beach of pebbles and sand, and the lost city of Ys is said to lie in the waters of the bay. At low tide, caves in the rocks are exposed, and these can be explored.

AUDIERNE AND ITS BAY - dunes, birds and surfboarding

Audierne is a small,replica sunglasses busy port with traditional Breton houses and brightly coloured boats which come in and out with the tides of the Goyen estuary. Audierne is a real find, as its charms have yet to be discovered by mass tourism. Take time to explore the upper town with its narrow streets, tiny shops and old houses.

A trip to the Ile de Sein - about 1.5 miles west of the town is the large Audierne beach which faces south, has a marina, a watersports club and the Saine-Evette pier, from where there are sailings for the Ile de Sein.

ILE DE SEIN

“Like a flat plate lying on the water with enough pepper (courage) to blot out the sun.” This is how the poet Georges Perros described the Ile de Sein. The island looks totally unlike the other islands off Brittany, and one is almost afraid to go there and disturb the environment. Throughout history, its inhabitants, who number only 350 or so out of season, have distinguished themselves by their courage. They earn their livelihood by fishing and from growing potatoes, and they are extremely tenacious, if only to resist the elements. This makes them all the prouder to be Senans, the French name for Sein islanders.